5-Stage Drinking Water Purification Filters Out Contaminants

Our Oasis-3 water purification system is currently being developed. We expect to launch the product by Q2 2017. Please join our mailing list for updates including pricing and availability. Thank you.

The Oasis-3 water purification system uses filters and ultraviolet light to remove biological, inorganic and chemical contaminants from dirty water making it safe to drink.

Water is passed through a series of filters which progressively removes larger then smaller material. The chart below shows how different water-borne threats are eliminated turning polluted water into clean, potable water safe for human consumption.

  • Filter #1 - 80-mesh (177 micron) screen removes heavy solids such as sand and organic material.
  • Filter #2 - 50-micron sediment filter removes sediment including sand, mud and other suspended solids.
  • Filter #3 - A choice of 0.2, 0.45, or 1-micron "absolute" rated membrane filter removes fine sediment including hair, dust, protozoa, viruses, bacteria and cysts.
  • Filter #4 - 10-micron activated carbon filter removes chemicals, tastes and odors.
  • Filter #5 - Intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light scrambles the DNA of bacteria and viruses rendering 99.99% of them sterile.
Water enters the filter... Polluted Dirty Clear Clean
Filter Removes Filters
#1 & #2
Filter
#3
Filter
#4
Filter
#5
Amoeba Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant  
Anthrax   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Arsenic     Filters the contaminant  
Barium     Filters the contaminant  
Chlorine taste     Filters the contaminant  
Cholera   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Cryptosporidiosis   Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant
Diarrhea causative   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Diphtheria       Filters the contaminant
Dysentery   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
E. Coli   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Gastroenteritis causative (rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus, astrovirus)   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Giarda lamblia cysts   Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant  
Herbicides     Filters the contaminant  
Insecticides     Filters the contaminant  
Lead     Filters the contaminant  
Legionella       Filters the contaminant
Leptospirosis   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Microbial cysts   Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant  
Organic matter Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant    
Pesticides     Filters the contaminant  
Petrochemicals     Filters the contaminant  
Poliomyelitis   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Rust / Sand / Sediment / Silt Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant    
Scale Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant    
Selenium     Filters the contaminant  
Solvents / Trihalomethanes   Filters the contaminant Filters the contaminant  
Staphylococcus infections       Filters the contaminant
Streptococcus infections   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Tuberculosis causative   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Typhoid causative   Filters the contaminant   Filters the contaminant
Volatile Organic Compounds     Filters the contaminant  
Water exits the filter... Dirty Clear Clean Safe
to drink!

 

Filter Types

Membrane filtration removes various sized contaminants from water by passage through a microporous membrane. A typical micro-filtration membrane pore size range is 0.1 to 10 microns (µm). The larger the pore size, the greater the flow of water (and contaminants!) through the filter. Membrane filtration is fundamentally different from reverse osmosis and nanofiltration because those technologies use pressure as a means of forcing water to go from low pressure to high pressure. Read a useful guide on membrane filtration published by The National Environmental Services Center.

Activated carbon filtration uses activated carbon to remove contaminants and impurities, utilizing chemical adsorption. Each piece of carbon is designed to provide a large section of surface area, in order to allow contaminants the most possible exposure to the filter media. For example, 1lb (450 g) of activated carbon contains a surface area of approximately 100 acres (40 hectares). This type of carbon is activated with a positive charge and is designed to attract negatively charged water contaminants. Carbon filters are most effective at removing chlorine, sediment, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from water. However, they are not effective at removing minerals, salts, and dissolved inorganic compounds. Read more about carbon adsorption.

Ultraviolet (UV) filtration uses low-pressure mercury-vapor lamps to emit about 86% of their light at 254 nanometers (nm), which causes adjacent thymine molecules on DNA to dimerize (combine with similar molecules). If enough of these defects accumulate on a microorganism's DNA, its replication is inhibited, thereby rendering it harmless (even though the organism may not be killed outright). However, since microorganisms can be shielded from ultraviolet light in small cracks and other shaded areas, UV lamps are used only as a supplement to other filtration techniques (in this case the membrane and carbon filters). The UV lamps must be replaced after 9,000 of use or annually (whichever comes first) because their germicidal effectiveness diminishes over time. You can read a more in-depth explanation of ultraviolet disinfection for potable water.